Pope Michael

Saint Peter’s Chains

Posted by on Aug 1, 2019 in Catholic Action, Pope Michael, Sanctification | 0 comments

This consideration is being prepared mainly for Facebook, but will be shared with all, because We believe it is important. Let us begin with the story of today’s Feast, Saint Peter’s Chains.

“And he killed James, the brother of John, with the sword. And seeing that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to take up Peter also. Now it was in the days of the Azymes.” (Acts 12:2-3)

Please continue to read on your own later on. Peter was imprisoned. Today many consider the Church imprisoned by the officials possessing the buildings in Rome, which once belonged to the Church. And what is their reaction? There is much saber rattling, about storming Rome some day, and running the bums out, if we could get enough people together. This has been going on for decades, but noting has been done.

What did the Church do, when Peter was imprisoned? Acts (2:5) gives us the answer: “Peter therefore was kept in prison. But prayer was made without ceasing by the church unto God for him.” The Church in Jerusalem did not gather together and make a plan to break Peter out of prison. They did not gather together and talk about how evil Herod was. No, they gathered together to do what is truly important, take this problem and present it to God in prayer, and ask Him for a solution. Read the rest of the story and find out how God answered their prayer.

We are all in agreement, that the Church is in a severe crisis. What people differ in is the extent and conditions of the crisis. People waste a lot of time in trying to define these points and in complaining about the causes of the crisis. What we do not hear is a call for prayer and fasting asking God to end the crisis. “But prayer was made without ceasing by the church unto God.” We have defined a few misunderstood points, but are taking Our own time in developing them. The reason is simple. “For whereas for the time you ought to be masters, you have need to be taught again what are the first elements of the words of God: and you are become such as have need of milk, and not of strong meat.” (Hebrews 5:12) People are still little babes in the spiritual life, and can understand these points about as well as a baby can understand the History of the Church. What we need first is to grow up as saints, and be ready for the meat and potatoes of the spiritual life.

Let us go over to Saint Paul. Read, beginning at I Corinthians 2:11 and continue to I Corinthians 3:5. Yes, we are giving you a reading assignment, because this is how we grow up, by taking and reading for ourselves. Saint Paul contrasts three kinds of people, sensual, carnal and spiritual. Now, we are called to be spiritual, because only the spiritual are ready for meat, as Saint Paul says: “I gave you milk to drink, not meat; for you were not able as yet. But neither indeed are you now able; for you are yet carnal.” (I Corinthians 3:2) At least the carnal are ready for milk, and there is some hope they will grow up. The sensual are in far worse shape. The Douay defines the sensual as: “he who measureth divine mysteries by natural reason, sense, and human wisdom only.” How many today are applying natural reason to spiritual concepts. No wonder, people cannot figure things out. It is like trying to measure air pressure with a light meter, instead of a barometer.

And so, let us begin growing up spiritually. At the website, there is a resource, that may be helpful here: https://www.vaticaninexile.com/olive_tree_archives.php Also recommended is Sacred Moments from the VIE Catholic Radio. https://www.viecatholicradio.com/program_guide.php

And so, let us pray fervently and without ceasing, (I Thessalonians 5:17)

+Michael pp

Complete definition of the sensual man from the Douay: “The sensual man is either he who is taken up with sensual pleasures, with carnal and worldly affections; or he who measureth divine mysteries by natural reason, sense, and human wisdom only. Now such a man has little or no notion of the things of God. Whereas the spiritual man is he who, in the mysteries of religion, takes not human sense for his guide: but submits his judgment to the decisions of the church, which he is commanded to hear and obey. For Christ hath promised to remain to the end of the world with his church, and to direct her in all things by the Spirit of truth.”

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End of Lent Consideration

Posted by on Apr 18, 2019 in Catholic Action, Pope Michael, Sanctification, Vocation | 0 comments

Dear friends in Christ,

It has been some time, since We have sent a message out. It has been busy here, and good things are unfolding for the Church. It is time for us to die with Jesus Christ in His Passion, then rise with Jesus at the Resurrection. We have been discussing Baptism here, as the Traditional Catechism website is at that stage. https://www.traditionalcatechism.com/the_necessity_of_baptism.php

Let us look at something else Saint Paul said (Colossians 2:12, 13) “Buried with him in baptism, … he hath quickened (us) together with him.” And elsewhere (I Corinthians 12:13) “For in one Spirit were we all baptized into one body, whether Jews or Gentiles, whether bond or free; and in one Spirit we have all been made to drink. [14] For the body also is not one member, but many.”

We die as individuals in Baptism, but rise up as a part of Christ’s Mystical Body. This is why Saint Paul could say: “And I live, now not I; but Christ liveth in me.” (Galatians 2:20) In fact in Baptism our self is buried with Christ, and we cease to live our our own self, but to live with Jesus. Jesus said (John 4:34): “My meat is to do the will of him that sent me, that I may perfect his work.” After Baptism, this should be our will as well.

Pope Pius XII wrote a wonderful Encyclical on the Mystical Body of Christ. As Christians by our Baptism, we become united with each other. And this union should show forth not only in word, but also by our actions. Rising with Christ, means uniting not only with Him, but also with His Mystical Body, the Church. All baptized people should be perfectly united in doing the will of God. This should be the center of our lives.

Let us consider this from Saint Paul (I Corinthians 12:20-22): “But now there are many members indeed, yet one body. And the eye cannot say to the hand: I need not thy help; nor again the head to the feet: I have no need of you. Yea, much more those that seem to be the more feeble members of the body, are more necessary.” The Mystical Body needs all of us to be active, doing the part assigned to us by Almighty God. When we as members of the Mystical Body become lax in performing our part in the Mystical Body, the body becomes sick.

Today there are over a billion baptized people, but only a handful living their Baptism. The head cannot live without the body, and so We, as Pope, are not capable of doing much without the hands, the feet, the eyes, etc. You are these hands, feet, eyes, etc. No part of the Mystical Body is unimportant, no matter what their position is, nor how humble it is.

Soon we will be making an announcement of a project that we are pursuing for the good of the Mystical Body of Christ. We ask all to pray for the success of this project. The first step finds a man, who is willing to make some great sacrifices to help the Mystical Body of Christ. God in all ages has called people to make great sacrifices for the good of the Mystical Body of Christ. And these are of two basic classes. The first are the martyrs, who lay down their lives for the Mystical Body. Then there are those who are called to a life of self-sacrifice. Some of these we know by name, as they have been declared saints. Others have silently sacrificed, unknown to all but a precious few surrounding them.

God is calling people today as well. Read what Father Francis Dominic writes below. Consider it well, meditate on it, reread it, consider it in your heart, etc. We have been meditating on this for most of this year, so far. There are many good points, which We have taken to heart.

Let us consider this point well: “But for God to use us in the same manner, we must have a servant’s heart. We must empty ourselves of ourselves, and humble ourselves before our Lord.” We have summarized the spiritual life as All Thee, Almighty God, and no me. We need to be tools in the hands of God, which He uses as He wills. Some of us are hammers, other screw drivers, etc. Let us be the tool God wants us to be, not the tool we think we should be.

As we complete Lent, let us rise with Jesus Christ as a useful member of the Mystical Body of Christ. In a day or two We shall consider another inspiration from Father Francis Dominic’s devotion, which We now offer to you.

Michael, by the grace of God, Pope

From Father Francis Dominic

When the Israelites were in Egypt, God could not set them free from their slavery until He had found a man who was fit to represent Him. And God was prepared to wait till such a man was ready. God had planned for the Israelites to be in Egypt for 400 years (Genesis 15:13). But they finally stayed for 430 years (Exodus12:40). Why did they have to stay 30 years longer than God’s perfect plan for them? It was certainly not because God made a mistake. God never makes any mistakes. But the man who was to be their leader was not yet ready. God had probably planned for Moses to be ready within ten years of his going into the wilderness. But instead Moses took forty years to complete his spiritual education there, under God’s hand. So the Israelites had to remain in slavery for another 30 years. Once when Moses was away from the Israelites for just 40 days, all 2 million of them went astray (Exodus 32). It took just a few days for a whole nation to forsake the true God and to go astray worshiping idols, once God’s man was delayed from coming down off the mountain. Those Israelites had seen amazing miracles before their very eyes. But the memory of those miracles could not preserve the Israelites from worshiping idols. Only the strict leadership of one man of God could do that! Aaron was their temporary leader, while Moses was away on the mountain. But although Aaron may have been a good, God-fearing man, he could not keep the people devoted to God. Obviously he was a man who sought to please the masses, and the people took advantage of him. There are many Church leaders like Aaron today, who imagine themselves to be serving the Lord. They are good, upright people, who live God-fearing lives. But God cannot use them to keep His Church pure, because they yield to the will of the people easily. God looks for men like Moses, even today, to lead His Church in its battle against Satan.

Consider another time in Israel’s history, when Ahab made everyone worship Baal. There were 7000 men at that time in Israel, who refused to worship Baal (1 Kings 19:18). That was undoubtedly a bold and creditable stand to take. But God would not use even one of these 7000 men to accomplish what He had purposed in Israel at that time. For that, God needed an Elijah. Ahab was not afraid of these 7000 “believers”. But he was afraid of Elijah. These 7000 men no doubt prayed to God; but their prayers could not bring fire down from heaven. It was the prayer of Elijah, that did that. The prayers of all believers are not equal in their effect in God’s presence. The Bible says in relation to Elijah, that “For the continual prayer of a just man availeth much..” (James 5:17-16). One man single-handedly, turned a whole nation back to God, routed the forces of wickedness and killed all the prophets of Baal. It is through one faithful man, and not necessarily through a multitude, that God’s purposes are accomplished, even today.

There were fifty “sons of the prophets” (Seminary students) in Elijah’s time who were all hoping to be prophets in Israel one day. But the Spirit of God bypassed all of them and came upon Elisha, who was not a “son of a prophet” (2 King 2:7,15). Elisha was known in Israel only as a servant – “who poured water on the hands of Elijah.” (2 King 3:11). When the army of the king of Aram attacked Israel, none of these fifty “Seminarians” could protect Israel – for although they may have studied the Law of Moses, they were not the one’s God had chosen to forewarn the nation as to where exactly the enemy would attack. God chose Elisha a simple servant. Today also, the main function of a prophet is similar: To warn God’s people in advance of where Satan will attack them. One prophet like Elisha, in the Church today, can save God’s people from spiritual calamity more than fifty Scholars and Lawyers (sons of the prophets) within the Church. All the Doctrine and all the Canon Laws are of no use if a man cannot hear the Spirit’s voice. Only a man who can hear God’s voice can save a Church from Satan’s schemes and attacks. The prophets of old were also called “SEERS” (“those who can SEE into the future with God-given vision” – 1 Kings 9:9). They knew where the enemy would attack, and could foresee the dangers of taking a particular course of action. The church today greatly needs such seers.

We need more Saint Martin de Porres, Saint Mary Magdalene’s de Pazzi, Saint Francis’s of Paola, Saint Frances of Rome, Blessed Margaret’s of Castello, Saint Anthony’s of Padua and Saint Bernard’s of Clairvaux, to name just a few. All of which warned the people or person of future matters and events and who guided others closer to God. But for God to use us in the same manner, we must have a servant’s heart. We must empty ourselves of ourselves, and humble ourselves before our Lord.

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What Is Yet Wanting To Me?

Posted by on Apr 10, 2019 in Catholic Action, Monastery, Pope Michael, Sanctification, Vocation | 0 comments

A good mother can simply look over to her children and give THE LOOK. The children know from their mother’s look, what is expected of them and the consequences should they not do what is expected. A lot can be said with a look, and we find this in Sacred Scripture as well.

Jesus had warned Peter that he would deny Him. After doing so, we read: “And the Lord turning looked on Peter. And Peter remembered the word of the Lord, as he had said: Before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice.” (Luke 22:61) Consider what all Jesus communicated in that one look. We find the result in the next verse: “And Peter going out, wept bitterly.” One look brought about repentance.

And now to our main story, which is related in two of the Gospels:

“And behold one came and said to him: Good master, what good shall I do that I may have life everlasting? Who said to him: Why asketh thou me concerning good? One is good, God. But if thou wilt enter into life, keep the commandments. He said to him: Which? And Jesus said: Thou shalt do no murder, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness. Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. The young man saith to him: All these I have kept from my youth, what is yet wanting to me? Jesus saith to him: If thou wilt be perfect, go sell what thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come follow me. And when the young man had heard this word, he went away sad: for he had great possessions. ” (Matthew 19:16-22)

“And embracing them, and laying his hands upon them, he blessed them. And when he was gone forth into the way, a certain man running up and kneeling before him, asked him, Good Master, what shall I do that I may receive life everlasting? … Thou knowest the commandments: Do not commit adultery, do not kill, do not steal, bear not false witness, do no fraud, honour thy father and mother. But he answering, said to him: Master, all these things I have observed from my youth. And Jesus looking on him, loved him, and said to him: One thing is wanting unto thee: go, sell whatsoever thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me. Who being struck sad at that saying, went away sorrowful: for he had great possessions. (Mark 10:17, 19-22)

What prompted this man to come to Jesus? We are not told, but we can work out what may have happened. He had heard of Jesus and the Holy Ghost prompting him to go see Jesus, because the Father had a mission for this man. And so he approached Jesus and asked: “Good master, what good shall I do that I may have life everlasting?” Saint Matthew says the man asked: “what is yet wanting to me?” The Holy Ghost had prompted the man to come and the man may have known deep down that God wanted more from him, which prompted him to ask the question.

And what happens next? Saint Mark gives us more detail: “And Jesus looking on him, loved him, and said to him: One thing is wanting unto thee: go, sell whatsoever thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.” What is translated as looking on him has more meaning in the Latin. The word used is intuit from which we get the word in English intuition. And so this look of Jesus has much meaning. Jesus not only conveyed His message through word, but also through the look on His holy face.

Unfortunately this man was not ready to make the sacrifice, although it appears that he knew what Almighty God wanted from him. He knew God’s will, which is what prompted him to come to Jesus in the first place. When He heard Jesus’ words and knew the will of God through Jesus’ look, instead of doing God’s will, he went out and cried.

The Fathers of the Church are of the opinion that this man lost his soul, because he did not follow Jesus’ advice. Some might argue that this is only a counsel and not a command. However, consider Who is asking. Jesus asked several others to “come follow Me.” What was their response? They left everything at once and followed.

Now the question we must ask our own self: “What is yet wanting to me?” What am I holding back, that Almighty God wants from me? Lent is a good time to ask this question, listen to the answer, and then do what God wants us to do. This is no time to hold anything back, but to give our all to Almighty God. To do otherwise may be an eternal fire hazard.

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Coming down from the mountain

Posted by on Jan 21, 2019 in Pope Michael, Sanctification | 0 comments

Father Francis Dominic wrote:

Matthew 14:23 And having dismissed the multitude, he went into a mountain alone to pray. And when it was evening, he was there alone.

There were times that Jesus separated himself from the multitudes, and there are times when we need to separate ourselves from our lives and ministry, and spend some time with our Lord.

I love how Jesus climbed a mountain. It made me think of an interesting analogy. Picture the shape of a mountain. It starts out wide at the bottom — the higher we climb, the narrower it becomes — and the more we must stay close to the center.

As we go even higher yet, there’s less room to move to the left or the right — and there’s less and less ground that can be compromised — the more focused we need to be and the less we can afford to be distracted. The higher we go, the less room we have to fool around!

Whatever you may be dealing with, you may just need to separate yourself and climb up to spend time with the Lord — get centered on Him and focused on what He’s calling you to.

God wants us to learn to climb to the top and focus all of our lives on His will! Let’s take out some time today to try it!

Dear friends,

We actually were able to clear three days last week to go up a mountain. Sunday We returned with Our Mass at Thornton Place on the other side of town. This week, We are back down with work and other obligations most of the week.

Today people are seeking solutions to the problems in the Church and the world in all of the wrong places. We seek to teach, preach and what is even more fruitless, debate.

“And in all seduction of iniquity to them that perish; because they receive not the love of the truth, that they might be saved. Therefore God shall send them the operation of error, to believe lying:” (II Thessalonians 2:10) Recently, We have seen just how pervasive the operation of error can be. If we do not love truth, we will also believe the operation of error. And there I no earthly way we can convert someone who does not love truth. My friends, the solution to the problems of the Church and of the world will be found on the mountain in prayer. True, duty calls us down from the mountain, but we can bring the spirit of the mountain down with us. You may be able to take the man of God off of the mountain, but you cannot take the mountain away from the man of God. And so, let us pray.

+Michael pp

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What Is Wanting?

Posted by on Dec 15, 2018 in Catholic Action, Pope Michael, Sanctification | 0 comments

Dear friends,
Recently We sent three things written by Father Fancis Dominic for your consideration. The first was on the wall of fire, which surrounds God’s Church, which Saint Alphonsus believes we must all go through. The second is an invitation to become truly like Jesus Christ, that is self-less. When we walk through the wall of fire, self gets burnt away. The third, which We added is on pride and the man, who came to Jesus to ask: “What is yet wanting to me?” (Matthew 19:16-25)
Father Francis Dominic wrote: “The fire of God does not fall on many today, because they have not placed everything on the altar. They are willing to give up everything for the Lord, except their jobs and their comforts. If anything on this earth is still valuable and precious to you, then you are not a disciple of Jesus.” Saint Paul says of the people of our time, and this includes many of us: “Men shall be lovers of themselves … lovers of pleasures more than of God.” (2 Timothy 3:2,4) Do we love our jobs or our comforts more than God? Jesus said: “If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple. And whosoever doth not carry his cross and come after me, cannot be my disciple.” (Luke 14:26-27) If you were given a choice between doing God’s will and losing your family, or compromising in order to keep your family, what would you do? If you will or have compromised, then you are on the wrong side of the wall of fire. God demands for us to be all in.
Let us consider a couple of people and their stories. The first realized that he had been deceived (Matthew 24:24) by a Traditionalist group and that he must depart from them. Because he had taken a prominent position in the group, he also felt the duty to go public with the will of God. At one point, a very public opportunity was offered. He told his family, that if they believed they needed to distance themselves for their own safety, he would understand, but he said that he must take this opportunity.
Another person found themselves in a similar situation. When they spoke the truth, they found out that truth has a very ugly daughter, hatred. All of these people lived in or near a small town, which made things worse. For several years, he would be walking downtown doing errands and see someone he had known. He would then watch them cross the street in order to avoid him.
And yet another person realized God’s will would require him to take a very unpopular position with the world and many who call themselves Catholic, but do lie. (Apocalypse 3:9) He knew that he would lose family and friends, and indeed he did. In fact, part of his family refuses to have anything to do with him to this very day.
None of these were offered martyrdom, but consider what the martyrs suffered in the defense of truth and virtue. Are we ready to imitate them, if offered the same opportunity? If not, then we also say we are Catholics, but do lie. We may have all of the external marks, baptism, profession of the Faith, union with the Pope, but without the internal desire to do God’s will no matter what it costs our Catholicism is a mere facade.
Above we considered the man, who had great riches and came to Jesus asking: “What is yet wanting to me?” Let us go to the end of the story: “Jesus saith to him: If thou wilt be perfect, go sell what thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come follow me. And when the young man had heard this word, he went away sad: for he had great possessions.” (Matthew 19:21-22)
Let us all ask our own selves, what is yet wanting to me? What am I holding back from Jesus, that He is asking me for, either Himself directly or through His holy Church.
+Michael pp

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A Hedge

Posted by on Dec 13, 2018 in Catholic Action, Pope Michael, Sanctification | 0 comments

Dear friends,
Father Francis Dominic wrote another very good devotion, which we should all take to heart. We will follow with Our own thoughts in a few days:
The Lord says, “And I sought among them for a man that might set up a hedge, and stand in the gap before me in favour of the land, that I might not destroy it: and I found none.” (Ezekiel 22:30).
God is looking for men and women today, who will stand in the gap for the Church – selfless people, who are not taken up with just their own needs, but who are concerned about God’s work.
Many believers think that sanctification means just the refinement of their personal conduct and behaviour. But true sanctification makes a person selfless like God – or in other words, like Jesus.
No-one really knew what God was like until Jesus came to earth, and explained Him (John.1:18). And what do we learn of the nature of God, when we look at Jesus? We see that the Divine nature is one that is willing to give up everything, and to be inconvenienced to any extent, if as a result, sinners can be saved from their sin and brought back to God.
Jesus did not come down from heaven because He wanted to gain something for Himself. No. He came to earth totally for the benefit of others. He lived for others. He fasted and prayed and gave Himself – all so that others might partake of God’s salvation. It is this spirit that is so rare to find even among the leaders in the church today. Although many speak of partaking of God’s nature, very few actually partake of this selfless love for others.
Many are willing to deny themselves and take up the cross if that will bring them some benefit – perhaps some spiritual benefit such as a place in the Bride of Christ, but still something for themselves. But if we were to ask ourselves, “what have we denied ourselves purely for the benefit of others,?” we may discover that the answer is, ‘Almost nothing’.
There are many in our midst who despise the ideal of their child giving their life totally to Christ and His Church as a Nun, Monk, or Priest. But before you criticise them, it may be good to ask yourself whether YOU would be willing to resign your job in order to become a missionary in a rural area of the world. It is easy to despise others who don’t have as much light as we have. But despite all the light that we have received, we may still be loving our comforts and unwilling to give up anything costly for the Lord.
Jesus gave up His place in heaven in order to come and live on this earth for 33-1/2 years, without any of the comforts of modern civilization – only so that others might hear the gospel and be saved. He also resigned His job as a carpenter, so that He might devote all His time fully to the vocation of proclaiming the gospel to others.
It is this Spirit of Christ that has urged missionaries through the years, to suffer hardship and loss, so as to take the gospel to heathen lands, where the Name of Jesus had never been heard, to bring others to Christ. Those on the other hand, who travel and stay in 5-star comfort these days, and preach the gospel, are all tourists, by comparison.
It is good for us to read the biographies of saintly missionaries like Adrian of Dalmatia, or St. Pauls fellow worker Saint Urban who gave up everything for the Lord, so that we too can be challenged by their sacrifice and their devotion to the Lord. A holiness that does not lead to a sacrificial life is a deception – for true holiness is not just being free from sin, but being free from Self-love too.
The fire of God does not fall on many today, because they have not placed everything on the altar. They are willing to give up everything for the Lord, except their jobs and their comforts. If anything on this earth is still valuable and precious to you, then you are not a disciple of Jesus.
+Michael pp

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