Take and read

Posted by on Jul 3, 2017 in Pope Michael, Sanctification | 0 comments

Dear friends,

We would like to ask you to read two pieces of Sacred Scripture. After this We will soon ask two simple questions and proceed to Our thoughts, as We are searching the Scriptures.

First read the books of Jonas and consider it well, then read Matthew 19: 16-22 and consider this story well as well.

May God bless and keep you,

+Michael pp

And the two questions:

  1. What are we to think of Jonas’ obedience to the will of God?
  2. Was the man in Matthew 19:16-22 saved or not?

The book of Jonas has four chapters. Let us look at the beginning of the first chapter of this book:

[1] Now the word of the Lord came to Jonas the son of Amathi, saying: [2] Arise, and go to Ninive the great city, and preach in it: for the wickedness thereof is come up before me. [3] And Jonas rose up to flee into Tharsis from the face of the Lord, and he went down to Joppe, and found a ship going to Tharsis: and he paid the fare thereof, and went down into it, to go with them to Tharsis from the face of the Lord.

We are reading the Autobiography of the Little Flower and she comments: “I think it was quite excusable in the prophet Jonas to fly before the face of the Lord, that he might not have to announce the ruin of Ninive.” We strongly recommend studying this work, because Saint Therese has much to say to us today.

For how many of us is this our attitude towards God’s will. If he tells us to go west to work for His Church, how many of us head east to do our own thing? Let us consider this well as we continue to study.

As we continue to read the ship is in danger and Jonas admits it is his fault and jumped overboard. In the next chapter a whale swallows him and then he prays and the whale gives him up on to dry land.

Chapter three begins:

[1] And the word of the Lord came to Jonas the second time, saying: [2] Arise, and go to Ninive the great city: and preach in it the preaching that I bid thee. [3] And Jonas arose, and went to Ninive, according to the word of the Lord: now Ninive was a great city of three days’ journey. [4] And Jonas began to enter into the city one day’s journey: and he cried, and said: Yet forty days, and Ninive shall be destroyed.

And what happened?

[5] And the men of Ninive believed in God: and they proclaimed a fast, and put on sackcloth from the greatest to the least. [6] And the word came to the king of Ninive; and he rose up out of his throne, and cast away his robe from him, and was clothed with sackcloth, and sat in ashes. [7] And he caused it to be proclaimed and published in Ninive from the mouth of the king and of his princes, saying: Let neither men nor beasts, oxen nor sheep, taste any thing: let them not feed, nor drink water. [8] And let men and beasts be covered with sackcloth, and cry to the Lord with all their strength, and let them turn every one from his evil way, and from the iniquity that is in their hands. [9] Who can tell if God will turn, and forgive: and will turn away from his fierce anger, and we shall not perish? [10] And God saw their works, that they were turned from their evil way: and God had mercy with regard to the evil which he had said that he would do to them, and he did it not.

At the preaching of Jonas, these people repented of their sins and the King proclaimed a fast to beg God’s forgiveness. And God forgave them.

It looks like Jonas’ ministry was quite successful, having brought the conversion of all the people. He should be rejoicing about this, but let us go to the last chapter:

[1] And Jonas was exceedingly troubled, and was angry: [2] And he prayed to the Lord, and said: I beseech thee, O Lord, is not this what I said, when I was yet in my own country? therefore I went before to flee into Tharsis: for I know that thou art a gracious and merciful God, patient, and of much compassion, and easy to forgive evil. [3] And now, O Lord, I beseech thee take my life from me: for it is better for me to die than to live.

He did God’s will, but did not get the results he expected. He expected God to destroy Ninive, but God spared it. And so Jonas complained. When we do God’s will, but do not get the results we expect or we want, do we also complain as Jonas did?

Let us imitate Nineve’s repentance rather than Jonas’s reluctance.

[1] And Jonas was exceedingly troubled, and was angry: [2] And he prayed to the Lord, and said: I beseech thee, O Lord, is not this what I said, when I was yet in my own country? therefore I went before to flee into Tharsis: for I know that thou art a gracious and merciful God, patient, and of much compassion, and easy to forgive evil. [3] And now, O Lord, I beseech thee take my life from me: for it is better for me to die than to live. (Jonas 4)

Apparently Jonas was not aware of this from Jeremias chapter 18:

[7] I will suddenly speak against a nation, and against a kingdom, to root out, and to pull down, and to destroy it. [8] If that nation against which I have spoken, shall repent of their evil, I also will repent of the evil that I have thought to do to them. [9] And I will suddenly speak of a nation and of a kingdom, to build up and plant it. [10] If it shall do evil in my sight, that it obey not my voice: I will repent of the good that I have spoken to do unto it.

Let us consider this from the second chapter of Joel:

[12] Now therefore saith the Lord: Be converted to me with all your heart, in fasting, and in weeping, and in mourning. [13] And rend your hearts, and not your garments, and turn to the Lord your God: for he is gracious and merciful, patient and rich in mercy, and ready to repent of the evil. [14] Who knoweth but he will return, and forgive, and leave a blessing behind him, sacrifice and libation to the Lord your God?

Our duty is to do God’s will no matter what the outcome might be. Jonas on the other hand decided to judge God’s will and decided in the first place to refuse to do God’s will. As a result God punished him. God could have let him go and be eternally punished, but punished him here to give us an example. When Jonas returned he did go and preach, and then complained when the city converted and God decided not to destroy it. Again this is judging God’s will, when we should merely conform ourselves to His holy will.

Let us meditate well on this, am I doing God’s will or am I doing things my way?

Fiat voluntas Tua,

+Michael pp

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